Brazil’s Bolsonaro extends tax breaks for labor-intensive industries By Reuters



© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Employees work at the construction site of a residential building, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sao Paulo, Brazil March 30, 2020. Picture taken March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Rahel Patrasso

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro approved a bill that extends payroll tax exemptions for 17 sectors of the economy in a bid to boost job creation, according to a decision published in the official gazette late on Friday.

The exemption was extended for another two years until end-2023, and benefits meatpackers, civil construction and the textile industry, among others.

“According to this measure, companies can choose not to pay the social security contribution calculated on the payroll and continue to contribute based on their gross income. Thus, companies have a greater incentive to hire staff,” according to a note from the president’s staff.

The government now needs to find sources of tax revenue to make up for the shortfall.

Alternatives include extension of the financial transactions tax (IOF) surcharge through 2023 and keeping the so-called CSLL levy charged from banks at a high level.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Employees work at the construction site of a residential building, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sao Paulo, Brazil March 30, 2020. Picture taken March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Rahel Patrasso

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro approved a bill that extends payroll tax exemptions for 17 sectors of the economy in a bid to boost job creation, according to a decision published in the official gazette late on Friday.

The exemption was extended for another two years until end-2023, and benefits meatpackers, civil construction and the textile industry, among others.

“According to this measure, companies can choose not to pay the social security contribution calculated on the payroll and continue to contribute based on their gross income. Thus, companies have a greater incentive to hire staff,” according to a note from the president’s staff.

The government now needs to find sources of tax revenue to make up for the shortfall.

Alternatives include extension of the financial transactions tax (IOF) surcharge through 2023 and keeping the so-called CSLL levy charged from banks at a high level.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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